Showing posts with label Acoustic Instrumental Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Acoustic Instrumental Reviews. Show all posts

Acoustic Instrumental Review:New Latitude-Wood, Steel, and Grace

Release Date: January 20, 2020
Label: New Latitude Music


Dave Erickson (acoustic guitar), Jim Carr (acoustic guitar), Deon Kuhl (drums & percussion) and Rick Brough (upright bass) are New Latitude. The former bass player Bob Strickland played on 5 tracks. Their latest release is Wood, Steel, and Grace.

This would serve as my introduction and a new discovery, so that starts things off with a lot of anticipation. After reading some history of the band I could tell it was going to be something I would enjoy.

The cover of the album is wood with various colorings, just like the music you will hear on this recording It is acoustic instrumental with a melting pot of styles and genres offered on the nine tracks. New Age, Jazz, and Latin flavored tracks flow effortlessly through their instruments.

I have a kinship for Latin music and “Días Calientes” was a quick favorite. There is that irresistible and colorful rhythm that runs through the song along with some very fast acoustic guitar playing. If they could have picked one spotlight track for the album this would be it. The musical gusto of each member of the band is quite impressive and when all of their talents come together it is like a musical carnival of sounds. 

“Open Road” is a jazz track, the embodiment of the “quiet storm” label minus the R&B reference. 
It is a distinct sub-genre of that particular kind of music. The transition from the previous track is perfectly executed and a reminder that the genres are close cousins in the diverse genre that jazz can give a listener.

“A Serious Man” is a fast-moving track featuring uplifting nimble-fingered guitar interplay. It is a wonderful listen that also spotlights the unmistakable standup bass with well-placed percussion. The choice for bass is excellent for this type of acoustic instrumental presentation, it complements the guitar playing and is the driving wheel of each track.

“Old Friends” was more of New Age style, it reminded me of some of the Windham Hill releases that came out when Will Ackerman was signing on artists to his label and getting this kind of music a world stage. Now the stage is infinite because of the internet and streaming, which is a good thing for any artist looking for exposure. The title of the track was perfect, it was like seeing an “Old Friend.”

The curtain closer “Prismatic Sky,” which also had a New Age sound and atmosphere and consequently was an easy choice to add to my New Age Music Reviews Spotify Playlist. It was a great way to end the album.

The range of musical style and expertise on display throughout the nine tracks is superb and I would most definitely appreciate another helping of this at any time. This is music for any time of day or night, or if you happen to be looking for something that will put a smile on your face and in your heart, then I would recommend listening to Wood, Steel, and Grace.

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
February 1, 2020

Founder of:

Review Provided By New Age Music Reviews

Tracks: 
1. Alpine Bliss (3:10)
2. Cruising Altitude (3:42)
3. Días Calientes (4:31)
4. Open Road (3:40)
5. Alpenglow (3:37)
6. A Serious Man (3:58)
7. Windmills (3:19)
8. Old Friends (3:12)
9. Prismatic Sky (3:03)
 

Acoustic Instrumental Review: David Lindsay-Last Passing of Summer


Release Date: October 10, 2018
Label: Fallingfoot Records

It has been two years since the music of David Lindsay came back into my world. My first taste was Nightbound. With the Last Passing of Summer David went into Will Ackerman’s Imaginary Road Studios to create some more magic. The consequences of going into that studio are nothing short of magnificent for any artist. On hand were several talented artists besides Ackerman and multi-instrumentalist and co-producer/engineer Tom Eaton.

The woodwinds of Jill Halley, cello of Eugene Friesen, the violin of Charlie Bisharat, the percussion of Jeff Haynes, vocals of Noah Wilding, and the electric guitar, cymbals, keyboards, piano of Tom Eaton are major contributors to the overall sound and textures of the music. All of the musicianship is outstanding on this recording, so expect a quality listen.

Once again as it was two years ago, simplicity is the concept here. David’s guitar is gentle yet inspiring. The music will resonate with you if you afford it a bit of introspection into the cover art and the track titles. Nature is an ever-changing occurrence and with that thought, the guitar playing can ebb and flow in the same way. If you listen to Last Passing of Summer you find that to be very true.

“Through The Fields” is one of the more rhythmic tracks and it serves as the quintessential acoustic guitar track. David’s guitar continually builds in the track and gets stronger with each change of pace. I found that my senses were aroused by this music. Most of the tracks are very relaxing and hold their own however this is the one track that really stood out for me.

“Sorrows of the Moon” was special because Will Ackerman played lead guitar. It reminded of the Windham Hill days and the music that influenced my tastes in music so much. “Chandos Lake” was another track with an upbeat feel to it and well played. 

So, what you get is the simplicity and beauty of the acoustic guitar that is accentuated with numerous other instruments that create a blanket of sound that the main instrument float over nicely. And yes, that explanation is as nice as it all sounds folks.

As another season is ushered in, David Lindsay gives us the colors and sounds to match the season on the Last Passing of Summer.  Acoustic instrumental music does not get any better and this album is highly recommended.

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
October 17, 2018
 
Founder of:

Review Provided By New Age Music Reviews

Tracks:
01. For Joni
02. Blue Skies
03. To The Sun
04. Look To The Sky
05. Through The Fields
06. Reverie
07. Last Passing of Summer
08. Sorrows of the Moon
09. Chandos Lake
10. Still Point
11. Night Vision
12. The Wind Shapes the Pines

Acoustic Instrumental Review: Ryan Judd-An Open Sky

Release Date: September 7, 2018
Label: Two Owls Music

Ryan Judd is a board-certified music therapist with a master's degree in music therapy and psychology. He works with children with special needs and found it was his calling once the opportunity was put in front of him. Bless people like Ryan, where would we be without out these saints to help us?

He also happens to be a very good guitar player. His music led him to his education and his final destination. His service is called The Rhythm Tree, which is very appropriate for his chosen field. An Open Sky introduces his music that helps his clients.

With the exquisite cello playing of Kristen Miller to accompany him, the album offers 10 tracks of acoustic bliss. I wonder if the Two Owls (Music) are referring to the two folks making all the music on this album?

If the instruments are played well and the arrangements are right for the particular instruments it can work very well. In this case, it certainly turns out that way as this duo combine to create some heavenly sounds. The whole idea behind this is that music is healing - yes, it is! I think with this fairly new profession of music therapy, that has come into focus more prominently. I remember watching a story about Glen Campbell when he was in the earlier stages of Alzheimer's and how he could remember all the words to his songs but anything else was a struggle. That is the power of music. Before he died he recorded an amazing album called Ghost on the Canvas. That story and that music have made such an impression on me, I will never forget it. It totally changed my way of thinking when it comes to music, the healing kind. 

All of those thoughts and feelings quickly coalesce for me when I hear music like I heard on An Open Sky. I think in this timeframe, the one that all of this was recorded, the artist opened his heart and soul to create this beautiful music. It does not take long for me to realize that after I understand why the music was made and for what purpose. I do not need that as an influence to hear and write about music, however, knowing more about how it came to be, made the listening experience that much more powerful. It is a tool to heal those that need help in any way, not necessarily for those that have special needs, anyone that needs some sort of healing can benefit from music like this.

Thanks to more and more people like Ryan Judd and recordings like An Open Sky I have evolved as a listener and spiritually. I am amazed at the power music holds for any listener. There is a lot of thought and effort that goes into making music so important to so many people. So, I say with all of my heart and soul, thank you, Ryan, for what you do for people and helping to make me a better person by listening to your music and reading your story.

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
August 25, 2018

Founder of:

Review Provided By New Age Music Reviews

Tracks:
01. Looking Back
02. The Embrace
03. An Open Sky
04. Heartstrings
05. Weightless
06. Autumn Light
07. Spanish Sunrise
08. Her Beauty Shines Through
09. Under the Willow Tree
10. Winter Harbo
r